Lawrence and Moby with a sled standing on the frozen ice

While the late and stormy spring may have delayed the start of the open water season, it meant more time for Blue Fish Canada volunteers to promote sustainable outdoor traditions. The following are 2017 Blue Fish Canada activity highlights.

Lawrence Gunther with the co-management team in front of the indigenous-inspired Ritchie Falls eco-tourism resort

Lawrence Gunther with the co-management team in front of the indigenous-inspired Ritchie Falls eco-tourism resort

Talking computers are just one of many innovations for the blind that allow Blue Fish Canada’s blind President Lawrence Gunther to lead and represent the charity. Articles published in 2017 include:

Lawrence Gunther’s truck, camper and boat

Lawrence Gunther’s truck, camper and boat

Of course, rain snow or sun never prevents a new episode of Blue Fish Radio from being produced – 162 episodes to date with an average weekly audience of 100,000.

Episodes focus on what people are doing across Canada to protect water quality, ensure fish health, and to make sure there are fish around for future generations to catch.

Lawrence releasing an 18-inch Walleye

Lawrence releasing an 18-inch Walleye

To further promote sustainable fishing, bi-weekly “Sustainable Fish Friday” 1-minute tips are heard and shared by thousands over social media. Additionally, over-20 “Blue Fish Canada Stewardship Tips” continue to be aired as public service announcements over streaming web broadcasts. We continue to distribute at no charge print and on-line stewardship guides and shoreline clean-up kits.

What Lies Below poster

What Lies Below poster

Six years of hard work on creating the documentary What Lies Below came to fruition. Over 18 festivals around the world have now featured the 79-minute film. Numerous published reviews and interviews can be found on line. Both CBC and AMI TV are now licensed to broadcast the doc, which premiered on CBC’s Documentary Channel Sept 6. All revenues generated by this documentary are going to Blue Fish Canada. Our 2018 plans include distributing an educational program to high schools and post-secondary institutions developed using the 11 stories told in the documentary.

Lawrence Gunther introducing fish-health Symposium Panel

Lawrence Gunther introducing fish-health Symposium Panel

Behind the scenes Blue fish Canada is working closely with numerous research facilities and water activist organizations to promote water quality and fish health. Last May, in partnership with the University of Ottawa and the St. Lawrence River Institute, we organized and chaired a half-day River Symposium including six presentations to over-90 researchers and policy makers in attendance. Ensuring fish have access to suitable habitat also includes leading discussions on fish health in venues such as the Great Lake Network and the People’s Great Lakes Summit series.

Chef Steve Mitton and Angler Lawrence Gunther in their outdoor kitchen

Chef Steve Mitton and Angler Lawrence Gunther in their outdoor kitchen

Canada is far from being a land of doom-and-gloom. We have much to take pride in and celebrate. It’s therefore with considerable excitement that we celebrate the launch of a new video series Lake2Plate.

The video features Lawrence, his guide dog Moby, and a celebrity chef fishing and preparing shore-side feasts featuring sustainably and selectively harvested fish and wild forage. It’s a true celebration of the traditional shore lunch intended to inspire others to reconnect with nature.

 

Lawrence and Moby on stage at the “Fish Hunt and Ride Outdoor Show”

Lawrence and Moby on stage at the “Fish Hunt and Ride Outdoor Show”

In the spirit of carrying forward the tradition of blind people serving as story tellers, Lawrence always makes time to speak to fish and game clubs, conservation groups and at outdoor shows. Exhibiting at outdoor shows remains a priority for Blue Fish Canada, and 2018 will witness a fresh new look to our exhibit space and offerings, including a new skill-testing stewardship quiz and prizes.

Lawrence Presenting to 150 high school students

Lawrence Presenting to 150 high school students

The following quote from Lawrence Gunther published in a recent Huffington Post article sums-up the mission of Blue Fish Canada nicely:

“I started Blue Fish Canada to encourage people to find themselves a pond, river, lake or bay where they can catch a fish for dinner once in a while, and to then take responsibility for ensuring nothing bad happens to their fishing whole that could stop their great grandchildren from doing the same.”

Lawrence and bass tournament partner Lisa Goodier

Lawrence and bass tournament partner Lisa Goodier

Getting others interested in fishing sustainably is a focus of Blue Fish Canada, including organizing annual events such as: Girl Guides Go Fishing.

A shore fishing experience for 50-70 Girl Guides ranging in age from 5-16.

Young Girl Guide holding a fish

Young Girl Guide holding a fish

Yes, it’s important to make sure our water and fish are properly managed. At the same time, Blue Fish Canada is working hard to pass on the knowledge and inspiration to encourage others to carry forward the tradition of fishing. It’s up to all of us to re-engage others in this century-old practice. One we can undertake with pride knowing the resource is being managed using science and the best traditional and indigenous knowledge available.

Most especially, Blue Fish Canada is creating opportunities for children to connect with shorelines. It’s here where kids experience the abundance and diversity of life that inhabits these narrow transition strips between land and water. Life that represents more than the sum of the two parts, but a true synergy of these two vastly different terrestrial and aquatic worlds.

Two young boys holding a net and freshly caught Northern Pike

Two young boys holding a net and freshly caught Northern Pike

Please donate to Blue Fish Canada today so we can continue to provide people of all age’s access to resources so they can fish confidently knowing the tradition is sustainable for future generations.

We look forward to your on-going support, and thank all of you for helping to make 2017 a year we can be proud of.

Anchors up….

Lawrence and Moby out on the lake

Lawrence and Moby out on the lake

Lawrence and Moby fishing at the shoreline on Victoria Island

The following multi-part news coverage includes three components intended to inform the public about the impacts on fish health of toxins in Canada’s water, and includes:

Link here to hear Lawrence Gunther’s segment on Live in Studio 5 across Canada;

Listen to episode 133 of Blue Fish Radio to hear Lawrence Gunther’s interview with Alaya BOISVERT from the David Suzuki Foundation;

Read the following op-ed Alaya BOISVERT and Lawrence Gunther penned which was published throughout Canada.

Rideau Canal toxins raise questions about our environmental wellbeing
Ottawa Citizen
May 19, 2017 | Last Updated: May 20, 2017 10:53 AM EDT

By ALAYA BOISVERT And LAWRENCE GUNTHER

It’s easy to understand why outdoor enthusiasts around the world regard Canada as a premier eco-tourism destination. What Canadian hasn’t enjoyed angling, skiing, hiking, snowmobiling, canoeing, mountain biking or taking a dip in one of hundreds of thousands of lakes that spot the country?

So much of the love for this nation, shared by locals and tourists alike, revolves around getting out on the land or water to connect with nature.

Despite its natural beauty, Canada is not the pristine environment we often imagine. When compared with other industrialized countries, Canada consistently ranks poorly. We place 15th out of 17 member nations of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development on a range of environmental indicators, according to the Conference Board of Canada’s 2016 assessment.

The recent discovery of toxins in the Rideau Canal is a stark reminder of a systemic and pervasive problem facing Canada.

The Rideau Canal is a signature of historic nautical ingenuity and contemporary urban recreation. It’s a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, widely cherished by those lucky enough to live nearby and millions of tourists who visit the capital year-round. However, at one time manufacturing facilities peppered the canal’s banks. Although these industries have closed, their toxic legacy remains.

After repairs to the canal churned up harmful industrial chemicals in November 2016, Parks Canada finally decided to take the first step to address this known, yet unreported, issue. It ordered tests along several kilometres of the canal to assess contaminant levels in the sediment. The Ontario government is also taking action to test toxicity levels of the various sport fish that inhabit the canal to determine whether they are safe to eat.

Local skaters and anglers are concerned by this news and the black eye it represents for their scenic tourist attraction. They are not alone in their worries about the impacts of pollution.

Environmental degradation and toxic contaminants can be found throughout the country. High concentrations of nitrogen dioxide pollution stretch from southeast to northern Alberta. Forty-three Great Lakes polluted sites were identified by the U.S. and Canada as Areas of Concern. Canada’s own Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory lists 23,078 toxic hotspots across Canada, and that doesn’t include those caused by Crown corporations, private individuals or that fall under the jurisdiction of other levels of government.

The Rideau Canal’s story raises a number of questions: Shouldn’t we leave our children a country better off than we inherited? Shouldn’t future generations be assured they won’t get sick from the food they eat, the water they drink or the air they breathe? Shouldn’t we all be able to count on the places we live, work and play being safe from harmful toxins?

The toxic contaminants found in the Rideau Canal, at the foot of Canada’s Parliament, represent a test case citizens across Canada will be watching closely.

The City of Ottawa has already demonstrated leadership by recognizing the environmental rights of its residents, as have 150 other municipalities in Canada.

It’s time for the federal government to acknowledge that a healthy environment is not a luxury. It’s a necessity for the long-term prosperity and preservation of our country and, more importantly, a human right. It’s time for the federal government to pass an environmental bill of rights to respect, protect and fulfill everyone in Canada’s right to a healthy environment.

Alaya Boisvert is manager of government relations with the David Suzuki Foundation’s Blue Dot project. Blue Dot is a national movement calling for legal protections of the right to a healthy environment.

Ottawa resident Lawrence Gunther is the host of Blue Fish Radio, a weekly podcast exploring the future of fish and fishing, and the president of Blue Fish Canada, a charity dedicated to water quality and sustainable recreational fishing.

Rideau Canal toxins raise questions about our environmental wellbeing

Hi everyone, you never know who you are going to meet, and the six degrees of separation that connect us all to each other. I wanted to share the following extraordinary sequence of events as I think it demonstrates just how small the world really is.

The other day I interviewed an older gentleman for an episode of Blue fish Radio. I met him at a double-screening of my documentary What Lies Below at a theater in Windsor for UN World Water Day. The screening was organized by the Detroit River Canadian Cleanup and included 200 high school students and another full house later that evening. The person I met attended with his son and grandson, and wrote me several days later with his story of growing up in northern Saskatchewan in Uranium City with his 11 brothers and sisters and father who worked as a miner in one of the uranium mines. His father died at age 48 from cancer.

His daughter later heard our interview and contacted me. She had never heard half the stories her father told during our interview. She also wanted to help get the word out about the film and what we are doing with Blue fish Canada. Turns out she’s a columnist with the Huffington Post.

Check out her article: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/what-dirty-secrets-are-hidden-below-the-surface_us_58e3976fe4b02ef7e0e6e09c

A Blue Fish Radio Exploration of Actions and Responsibilities

Who’s Doing What?

It is possible to selectively harvest wild fish from our oceans in a way that’s sustainable. Relevant science, programs and regulations are already being implemented. However, we all have a role to play. Our individual cooperation is essential, doable and relatively effortless. Learn how you too can be part of the solution.

You can ask a dozen people about what they think of the present state of our seafood fisheries and receive just as many different answers. Confusion stems mainly from the steady wave of reports head-lined by media predicting the end of wild fish stocks throughout the world due to excessive commercial fishing. At the same time, there are plenty of examples of currently sustainable harvesting practices and still more industry players who are working hard to turn things around. You seldom hear of these successes though, as they just don’t seem to warrant the same level of media hype as the doom-and-gloom stories.

Canada and the U.S. have begun applying precautionary science-based fish management principals in forming and implementing fishery management regulations with steadily increasing success. We aren’t out of the woods yet, but research used to determine which harvesting strategies are sustainable and those that are not, and more accurate fish population assessments, are helping the two countries to reverse their downward slides.

Global positioning technology is allowing for identified areas of high importance to marine life development to be subject to tighter management controls. Non-profits that have an interest in ocean sustainability are partnering with those in the seafood industry assessed as doing it right to have their products labelled as sustainable. Lots of stakeholders are buying into the principal of sustainability. It’s now up to the rest of us to get on board.Marine Stewardship Council logo

The Marine Stewardship Council is one of many non-profits busy identifying and working with commercial fisheries around the world to recognize those doing it right. Certified Sustainable means a commercial fisher’s wild fish stock harvesting practices will not threaten the long term viability of the fish stock itself. The MSC is also working with those more marginal fisheries by providing knowledge needed to earn the Marine Stewardship Council’s endorsement.

In this Blue Fish Radio episode Jay Lugar from the MSC explains how they have already applied their MSC label to 2/3 of Canada’s commercial fisheries.

 

A juvenile Lingcod photographed at a depth of 85 feet in the cold waters of southern British Columbia.

Juvenile Lingcod photographed at a depth of 85 feet in the cold waters of southern British Columbia.

 

Oceana Canada has a slightly less optimistic perspective on how far Canada has progressed. Their most recent 2016 report states only 24% of Canada’s wild marine fish stocks are at healthy levels. Oceana focusses its energies on scientifically documenting pointing out those fisheries that are performing badly. Hey, someone has to keep everyone on their toes and in this episode of Blue Fish Radio Oceana Canada’s Executive Director, Josh Laughren points out the heavy lifting that still needs doing.

 

SeaChoice, run out of the Suzuki foundation, is another organization dedicated to working with fisheries to improve sustainability. They differ from the Marine Stewardship Council in that their funding comes from an independent and unrelated source, so they don’t mind spending their time focussing on those fisheries that are causing the lion’s share of the problems.

Atlantic Mackerel

School of Atlantic Mackerel

 

In this Blue Fish Radio episode with Kurtis Hayne, SeaChoice is first to admit massive re-thinks on how we harvest certain wild stocks are crucial to getting it right.

 

4 seining

 

The Safina Centre has made it their mandate to scientifically assess which seafood harvesting practices and technologies need to go, which can be improved, and which are working just fine.
In this Blue Fish episode with Elizabeth Brown from the Safina Centre, we learn more about their work and how it underpins much of the rest of the sustainability certification efforts undertaken by organizations applying sustainable labels to seafood products.

 

Aquaculture is increasingly held up as an alternative to our continuing to harvest wild fish stocks. Maybe someday it will, but there are still many hurdles to overcome. One solution non-industry experts are pointing to is closed containment fish farming.

 

In this episode of Blue fish Radio [5] we speak with Jo Mrozewski to learn more about one such example, the Kuterra Salmon Farm on Vancouver Island.

 

Others are counting on the proliferation of marine protection areas or MPAs. What such designations actually mean varies widely. Yes, it’s a defined area of ocean, but what human activity can continue to take place within the zone ranges widely from a no-go zone for everyone, to a complete or partial boycott on commercial, and in some cases, sport fishing, to allowing tourism related activities only. What we are learning is that the nature of each prohibition needs to makes sense and be supported for each area, as without such support the MPA serves in name only.

Blue shark portrait

A portrait of a blue shark from the waters of Rhode Island

 

In this Blue Fish Radio episode Dr. Chris Harvey Clarke discusses the strengths, weaknesses and the role MPA’s play in promoting healthy and sustainable fish stocks.

 

Another solution borrows from the ground-swell interest by the public in purchasing their vegetables from local growers fresh and direct. Emerging community supported fisheries reward those commercial seafood harvesters who are willing to take the time to do it right. Fishers who have a vested interest in seeing the resource continue, and who are small enough that when they return to port they can sell most if not all of their catch to pre-determined local buyers and members of the public who have committed to buy equal shares with the knowledge that it was caught the right way.

 

Blue Fish speaks with Dr. Joshua Stoll who has made it his mission to document and share what it takes to establish community supported fishery initiatives.

 

If you don’t live nearby a bustling fishing port, than rest assured that the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise program is on the job educating restaurants and their seafood chefs on how to select seafood that was harvested in a sustainable way. The goal is that by putting pressure on suppliers, they in turn will start demanding that their producers, the fishers, will begin harvesting seafood in ways that can be certified as sustainable.

Wild male and female red salmon in river before spawning in symmetric position.

Wild male and female red salmon in river before spawning in symmetric position.

 

It’s a supply-and-demand economics 101 approach to fixing the problem that Claire Li from the Vancouver Aquarium’s Ocean Wise program explains in this episode of Blue Fish Radio as producing solid results.

 

One of the first organizations in North America to empower citizens to make sustainable choices is the Monterey Aquarium in northern California. The sea-side town of Monterey was once dominated by fishing boats and processing plants, but with the collapse of many of their area wild fish stocks, the town turned to tourism for its survival. One couldn’t ask for a more suitable and idyllic location for a public aquarium that now sees well over a million visitors come through its doors every year. One of the Aquarium’s programs is the distribution of small wallet-sized reference cards that list the sorts of wild fish commonly found and harvested in the Pacific, and then indicating with a series of three coloured lights which fish stocks are in danger, red, which stocks are of concern, yellow, and which stocks can be consumed guilt free, green.

Looking down at rays through the see through floors at Monterey Bay Aquarium

Looking down at rays through the see through floors at Monterey Bay Aquarium

While the Monterey’s SeaFood Watch program may be centred on Pacific fisheries, in this episode of Blue Fish Radio Ken Peterson explains how it’s applicable to all of North American consumers given that fish taken from the Pacific are transported to buyers throughout the continent.

 

Group of Beluga Whales

Group of Beluga Whales bobbing in the wild

 

Others, like the Aquarium Du Quebec explain in this Blue Fish Radio episode how they have modified the Seafood Watch approach to better suit their own region’s unique fisheries. They aren’t the only one who has adopted a “watch” program to better reflect their regionally harvested unique sea life.

 

Cod fish floating in aquarium

Cod fish floating in aquarium

 

Lobster

Lobster in its natural habitat

On the enforcement side, Alan Risenhoover of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports in this episode of Blue Fish Radio on the fruits of their hard work to develop and implement the scientific measuring sticks used in determining what stocks are still in decline and which are recovering. Applying as scientific approach to fish stock management, and putting an end to political interference on how stocks are managed, is proving effective as one species after another is taken off the list of distressed wild fish stocks.

 

In order to accurately track who is catching what and where, new tools for monitoring and tracing needed to be established. Systems that start with the vessel doing the harvesting, and then tracks each step along the way until the seafood is consumed. Such ship-to-plate traceability means accountability and bringing to an end the illegal harvesting of seafood.

Leatherback turtle with its head and back out of the water swims in the northern Altantic Ocean

Leatherback turtle with its head and back out of the water swims in the northern Altantic Ocean

 

It’s what Michele Kuruc, VP of ocean policy for the World Wildlife Fund, reports to be working hard to accomplish in this Blue Fish Radio episode, and it’s got the support of the U.S. government.

 

Live Dungeness crabs for sale at a Seattle market.

Live Dungeness crabs for sale at a Seattle market.

 

Not allowing ships to dock at our ports that won’t or can’t prove where their seafood was captured is just one new stick in the government’s tool chest. On-board remote cameras are another. Laurie Bryant from the NOAA reports on their “Fish Watch” program and its beneficial results in this episode of Blue Fish Radio.

 

Bringing to an end the outdated and unsustainable commercial harvesting practices and greed that still plague large portions of the commercial fishing industry that is taking place outside the territorial waters of Canada and the U.S. is imperative if we are to sustain the earth’s growing population. Achieving sustainable commercial fishing throughout the world hinges on all of us having greater awareness of the efforts being taken by the many different stakeholders. More importantly, if the oceans’ wild fish stocks and the ways they are being harvested are to return to sustainable levels, all of us need to begin to exercise responsible choices. The tools needed to make such choices are now available. It’s now up to each of us to incorporate these tools into our decision making processes when purchasing or consuming seafood.

 

 

In partnership with the City of Ottawa, Blue Fish Canada is distributing shoreline clean-up kits that include a garbage bag and disposable gloves contained within a biodegradable wrapper. The kits are slim, light and fit easily into any size tackle bag or glove box. Get your free kit and be prepared to tackle unsightly messes!

Contact Blue Fish Canada today to arrange to receive a kit, or to have kits sent to your organization.

Email: bluefishcan@gmail.com

Short audio format Blue Fish Canada Stewardship Fishing Tips are produced by Blue Fish Radio with support from Eukanuba pet foods. Each 2-minute tip explains how listeners can ensure the future of fish and fishing.

The following 20 Blue Fish Canada Stewardship Tips can be rebroadcast at no cost. Let us know if you would like to rebroadcast the tips by emailing bluefishcan@gmail.com.

Blue Fish Canada Stewardship Tips:

BFC-Tip 1 — Fertilizers: What you can do as a shoreline property owner and citizen to reduce the amount of phosphates and nitrogen’s entering our water.

BFC-Tip 1 — Fertilizers

BFC-Tip 2 — Catch and Release: Tips for ensuring the safe release of caught fish.

BFC-Tip 2 — Catch and Release

BFC-Tip 3 — Fish Slime: The importance of avoiding the removal of slime from fish.

BFC-Tip 3 — Fish Slime

BFC-Tip 4 — Fishing down Deep: Why certain fish should not be fished at depths below 30 feet if you intend to release them afterwards.

BFC-Tip 4 — Fishing Down Deep

BFC-Tip 5 — Harvesting: Which fish to keep for a meal, and which need to go back.

BFC-Tip 5 — Harvesting

BFC-Tip 6 — Invasive: How to stop the spread of invasive life forms into new bodies of water.

BFC-Tip 6 — Invasives

BFC-Tip 7 — Oil and Gas: Making sure we handle oil and gas so it doesn’t impact our water and fish.

BFC-Tip 7 — Oil and Gas

BFC-Tip 8 — Photography: Taking photos sustainably of memorable moments and trophy fish.

BFC-Tip 8 — Photography

BFC-Tip 9 — Regulations: Knowing the regulations that govern our recreational fisheries and when to apply reason.

BFC-Tip 9 — Regulations

BFC-Tip 10 — Research: Anglers play an important role in citizen-based science.

BFC-Tip 10 — Research

BFC-Tip 11 — Big Boat Little Boat: Kayaks are great, but we still need to get out and back safely.

BFC-Tip 11 — Big Boat Little Boat

BFC-Tip 12 — Dogs on Boats: Keeping our four-legged friends safe aboard our boats.

BFC-Tip 12 — Dogs on Boats

BFC-Tip 13 — Catch, Release or Keep: More tips on harvesting sustainably.

BFC-Tip 13 — Catch Release or Keep

BFC-Tip 14 — Mentoring the Next Generation: Passing on knowledge on how to fish sustainably.

BFC-Tip 14 — Mentoring the Next Generation

BFC-Tip 15 — Catch your Limit, Limit Your Catch: We have harvest limits but sometimes we need to know when it’s time to limit our harvest.

BFC-Tip 15 — Catch your limit, limit your catch

BFC-Tip 16 — Disposing Old Fishing Line: Fishing line can result in death for wild critters if not disposed of properly.

BFC-Tip 16 — Disposing old fishing line

BFC-Tip 17 — Lifestyles Flow Downstream: Understanding that all we do impacts all life that lives downstream.

BFC-Tip 17 — Lifestyles Flow Downstream

BFC-Tip 18 — Live Bait: Ensuring our live bait doesn’t become the cause of the next invasion or disease outbreak.

BFC-Tip 18 — Live Bait

BFC-Tip 19 — Right Size Tackle: Matching the size of rod, reel and line for the job is an important part of fishing sustainably.

BFC-Tip 19 — Right Size Tackle

BFC-Tip 20 — Pack it in, Pack it Out: Boy Scouts have it right when they teach kids to leave things the way they found them or better.

BFC-Tip 20 — Pack it in, Pack it Out

As the president of Blue Fish Canada, a federally incorporated registered charity focused on ensuring the future of fish and fishing, it’s with great pleasure and considerable pride that I’m able to announce the documentary I researched, wrote and hosted, “What Lies Below” has been selected to compete in the Canadian feature film category at the 2016 Planet in Focus Film Festival. Even better, the documentary has been chosen as the closing film for the festival on Oct. 23 at the Rogers Hot Docs Theater in Toronto, and will be part of the International Eco Hero Awards ceremony honoring Alexandra Cousteau.

What Lies Below presents ten significant fish habitat and sustainability stories and the concerns, fears, hopes and actions of the people I met and fished with who live by and from the water. In making this documentary, my goal was to explore issues facing Canada’s waters and wild fish stocks, and what people are doing to ensure the future of these important resources. In the words of the Executive Producer, Alex Sliman, CEO of Cinelande Inc, “It’s through Lawrence’s ability to perceive without the use of his sight that the rest of us will learn the truth about what’s really happening beneath the surface of our rivers, lakes and oceans”.

A special sneak-peek screening of the documentary is being organized by the Fresh Water Alliance as part of the 2016 Living Water Rally in Vancouver. More screenings are being organized across Canada.

What Lies Below from tech@post430.com on Vimeo.

The launch of “What Lies Below” represents a culmination of thousands of volunteer hours, the investment of considerable private resources, and a commitment by all those who worked and took part in its filming to ensure the future of fish and fishing. Profits from the documentary will go to Blue Fish Canada, to support programs to train people to fish sustainably and safeguard their aquatic resources.

It’s now up to all of us to get the message out that we all have a part to play. Sharing and liking the news of the launch through social media is one such action. Another is directly supporting Blue Fish Canada by making a donation.

Like us on Facebook: WhatLiesBelow
Follow us on Twitter: WhatLies_Below

Make an online tax deductible donation to Blue Fish Canada.

I thank you in advance for taking the time to consider how you might provide your support. Given the camouflaging properties of water, it’s far to easy to allow our rivers, lakes and oceans to be used as convenient waste receptacles, and to harvest fish unsustainably. Blue Fish Canada is working hard to educate people how to engage with our water and fish resources in ways that will allow humanity to establish a symbiotic relationship with our aquatic ecosystems, both now and in the future.

Sincerely,

Lawrence Gunther Euteneier
President
Blue Fish Canada
Email: Director@BlueFishCanada.Ca
Twitter: @LawrenceGunther
Web: www.BlueFishCanada.ca

[Download PDF]

TOP TEN TIPS:

  1. Use the right strength tackles so returned fish aren’t overly tired
  2. Don’t over harvest and don’t keep the larger breeders
  3. Be careful fueling engines to avoid polluting water.
  4. Recycle old fishing line so it doesn’t tangle and kill wildlife
  5. Clean-up shoreline waste and garbage.
  6. Take measures to stop Nitrates or Phosphates from entering the water
  7. Minimize time fish spend out of the water, and avoid removing a fish’s protective slime.
  8. Use barbless or non-offset circle hooks, and environmentally safe artificial baits.
  9. Be careful not to transport invasive fish and plants, or to spread disease
  10. Support fish health research by reporting tagged fish

Algae Blooms:
Nitrates and phosphates added to the water can lead to excessive growth of algae and algal blooms. Decomposing algae causes oxygen depletion and fish kills. Avoid using fertilizers mid-summer or when the ground is frozen. Maintain a natural buffer zone between your lawn and the shoreline. Have your septic system inspected annually.

Invasive fish and Disease:
Don’t Dump your Minnows. Invasive species of baitfish can overwhelm native fish species, or can spread disease. Purchase bait from dealers selling certified disease-free bait. Dump unused bait on dry land. Use baitfish only in waters where their use is permitted

Invasive Plants:
Invasive plants can often outgrow, replace, and destroy native plants. Be sure to remove seeds and plant matter from boots, waders and gear. Clean your boat and trailer thoroughly before transporting it to another body of water. Verify that any plant you buy is not invasive. Don’t release aquarium fish or plants into the wild.

Trash:
Pack it in, pack it out. Don’t leave used fishing line behind as it can tangle and kill wildlife. If you see garbage, clean it up.

Oil and Gas:
Keep engines and containers in good working condition and be careful when transferring new or used oil or gas. Have sorbent materials available should a spill occur. Label all containers appropriately.

Tackle:
A lip hooked fish stands a better chance of survival. Using single, barbless hooks or circle hooks are easier on fish. Non-lead weights or jigs are better for the environment, as are biodegradable soft plastic baits. Needle-nose plyers and hook cutters are essential.

Playing Your Fish:
Fighting a fish to exhaustion will decrease its chance of surviving. Use properly sized tackle to land fish quickly. Revive your fish in the water after being unhooked. When water temperatures are high, avoid exposing fish to air.

Photographing Fish:
Be ready. Have your camera handy and accessible before you land your fish. Keep your fish in the water and only lift it out when ready to take the photograph.

Handling Fish:
Wet your net before netting your fish, and always handle fish with wet hands. Don’t lay fish on carpet or grass and try not to let your clothing wipe important slime from the fish’s body leaving it open to infection. Fish that flop about on streamside rocks or the bottom of a boat harm themselves and expend undue energy. Keep a fish’s head in the water during the hook removal process. Never grab a fish by the eyes or gills. Avoid squeezing fish around the belly or hanging fish vertically as this can damage internal organs. Fish that seem unlikely to survive should be harvested.

Selective Harvesting:
Harvest fish from populations that can support a reduction in their numbers, from ecosystems that are thriving, and in sizes that ensure larger breeders carry on. Removing small numbers of mid-sized fish can ensure the remaining fish have sufficient food to reach full size.

Fish Research:
Anglers who report recaptures of tagged fish provide data that is vital to determining fish health. Report tagged fish including where and when the fish was caught, the tag number, and the size and weight of the fish. Return tagged fish to the water so the research might continue.

Regulations and Conservation:
Purchase your fishing license yearly so data on numbers of fishers can be collected, and to support fish research and conservation. Go on line and know the fishing regulations for the species of fish and area your fishing. Verify whether the fish you plan to harvest are safe to eat and in what amount. Finally, report toxic spills, fish kill-offs, and the illegal behaviours of others.

Thanks:
This Guide was made possible with the generous support of Oziles Marina, the Petrie Island Fishermen’s Association, and the Canadian National Sportsman Show.